Research Block Grants - Calculation Methodology

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Data inputs for research block grant schemes

Grant amounts under the research block grant schemes are driven entirely by metrics (one or more of research income, research publications, higher degree by research (HDR) student completions, HDR student load and staff numbers).

Data inputs are collected by the Department of Education and Training through the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC), the Higher Education Student Data Collection (HESDC) and the Higher Education Staff Data Collection.

In addition to these drivers, the SRE formula uses moderators based on data from the Research Hours Data Collection (Staff Hours Survey), SRE Financial Data Return, and the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative. The Transparent Costing moderator is designed to recognise individual differences in the indirect costs of Australian competitive grant research between institutions, while the Excellence Index moderator is designed to recognise and reward research performance at or above world standard according to the outcomes of the ERA initiative.

Research Income

Research income received by higher education providers (HEPs) is reported under the HERDC against four categories:

  • Category 1 - Australian competitive grants research income
  • Category 2 - Other public sector research income
  • Category 3 - Industry and other research income
  • Category 4 - Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) research income

For use in the research block grant calculations, research income data is averaged over the two most recent years for which it is available, and the four research income categories are unweighted.

For the Research Training Scheme (RTS) and the Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA) grant amounts, research income comprises 40% of the performance indexes.

For the Joint Research Engagement (JRE) grant amounts, research income (from Categories 2, 3, and 4) comprises 60% of the performance index.

For the Research Infrastructure Block Grants (RIBG) scheme grant amounts, only Category 1 income comprises the performance index.

Publications

Research publications are reported under HERDC against four categories and relate to institutions' capacity to disseminate research results in mainly peer-reviewed research publications. The categories are:

  • Books
  • Book Chapters
  • Journal Articles
  • Conference Papers

For use in the research block grant calculations, research publications data is averaged over the two most recent years for which it is available, and books are weighted by a factor of 5 and the other three categories are weighted by a factor of 1 (i.e. unweighted).

For RTS, JRE and APAs grant amounts, research publications comprise 10% of the performance indexes.

Student Completions

HDR student completions data is collected under HESDC and, for use in research block grant calculations, is weighted by level of course (i.e. Doctorate or Masters degree by research) and/or by course cost (i.e. whether the course is identified as a high cost course or a low cost course). HDR student completions data is averaged over the two most recent years for which it is available.

For RTS grant amounts, completions comprise 50% of the performance index and are weighted by level of course and by cost of course, as follows:

  • High Cost Doctorate Degree by Research weighted at 4.7
  • High Cost Masters Degree by Research weighted at 2.35
  • Low Cost Doctorate Degree by Research weighted at 2.0
  • Low Cost Masters Degree by Research weighted at 1.0

For APAs and IPRS grant amounts, completions comprise 50% of the performance indexes and are weighted by level of course only, as follows:

  • Doctorate Degree by Research weighted at 2.0
  • Masters Degree by Research weighted at 1.0

Student Load

Commonwealth-funded HDR student load is collected under the HESDC and, for research block grant calculations, is weighted by course cost, as follows:

  • RTS High Cost Places weighted at 4.7
  • RTS Low Cost Places weighed at 2.0

For JRE grant amounts, HDR student load comprises 30% of the performance index. Data is sourced from the most recent year available.

Calculation logic for Research Training Scheme (RTS) grant amounts

  • Index each institution's RTS grant amounts from three years prior to the grant year, two years prior to the grant year and one year prior to the grant year, to the grant year prices.
  • Calculate each institution's share of the RTS performance index, which comprises 50% HDR completions, 40% research income and 10% publications and uses data averaged over two years
    • For example, for 2016 grant amounts:
      0.5* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions) + 0.4* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 research income / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 research income) + 0.1* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 publications / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 publications).
  • Determine each institution's pre-safety net grant as per the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) model. For RTS grant amounts, the formula is:
    • (A x 0.25) + (B - (0.75 x A)) + (C - (B - (0.75 x A)) - (0.50 x A))[1] + (D x each institution's share of the RTS performance index) where
      • A = each HEPs grant amount from three years prior indexed to the grant year prices
      • B = each HEPs grant amount from two years prior indexed to the grant year prices
      • C = each HEPs grant amount from one year prior indexed to the grant year prices
      • D = Total RTS Pool for the grant year x 0.25[2]
  • Determine the variation between institutions' pre-safety net grant amounts and their prior year RTS grant amounts in grant year prices.
  • Determine any increase in funds from the prior year and total these funds into a "funding pool".
  • Distribute funds from the pool to those institutions whose pre-safety net grants are less than 95% of their prior year RTS grants (in grant year prices) to bring their grant year RTS grant amounts up to the 95% level.
  • Return the funds remaining in the pool to contributors based on their contribution.
  • For institutions whose grant year pre-safety net grants are less than 95% of their indexed prior year RTS grants, their final grant year RTS grants equal their pre-safety net grant plus funds required to bring them up to the 95% level.
  • For institutions whose pre-safety net grants are greater than 95% of their indexed prior year RTS grants, their final grant year RTS grants equal their pre-safety net grant minus funds required for the funding pool plus funds returned based on their percentage contribution.

[1] This is a complicated formula expression; however, it is expressed this way to give effect to the AVCC's model of returning 75% of the total RTS funds available for a calendar year from prior year's RTS grant amounts indexed to grant year prices.

[2] Under the RTS, only 25% of the total RTS funds available are allocated on the basis of institutional performance.

Calculation logic Joint Research Engagement (JRE) grant amounts

1) Calculate JRE Grant Amount

  • Calculate an amount equal to each institution's prior year JRE grant amount indexed to grant year prices.
  • Calculate each institution's share of the JRE performance index, which comprises 60% research income, 30% HDR student load and 10% publications and uses data averaged over two years (for income and publications). Load data uses the most recent year available:
    • For example, for 2016 grant amounts:
      0.6* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 research income Categories 2,3 and 4 / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 research income Categories 2,3 and 4) + 0.3* (institution's total 2014 weighted HDR student load / ∑ institutions' total 2014 weighted HDR student load) + 0.1* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 publications / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 publications).
  • Determine each institution's pre-safety net grant, which is each institution's share of the JRE performance index multiplied by the JRE total funds available for the grant year (i.e. program legislated amount)[1].
  • Determine the variation between institutions' grant year pre-safety net grant amounts and an amount equal to their prior year JRE grant amounts in grant year prices.
  • Determine any increase in funds from the prior year and total these funds into a "funding pool".
  • Distribute funds from the pool to those institutions whose grant year pre-safety net grants are less than an amount equal to 95% of their prior year JRE grants (in grant year prices) to bring their grant year JRE grant amounts up to the 95% level.
  • Return the funds remaining in the pool to contributors based on their contribution.
  • For institutions whose grant year pre-safety net grants are less than an amount equal to 95% of their indexed prior year JRE grants, their final grant year JRE grants equal their pre-safety net grant plus funds required to bring them up to the 95% level.
  • For institutions whose grant year pre-safety net grants are greater than an amount equal to 95% of their indexed prior year JRE grants, their final grant year JRE grants equal their pre-safety net grant minus funds required for the funding pool plus funds returned based on their percentage contribution.

2) Calculate JRE Cadetships Grant Amount

a) Calculate number of new JRE cadetships

  • Calculate each institution's share of the JRE performance index, which comprises 60% research income, 30% student load and 10% publications and uses data averaged over two years:
    • For example, for 2016 grant amounts:
      0.6* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 research income Categories 2,3 and 4 / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 research income Categories 2,3 and 4) + 0.3* (institution's total 2014 weighted HDR student load / ∑ institutions' total 2014 weighted HDR student load) + 0.1* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 publications / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 publications).
  • Determine each institution's number of new JRE cadetships, which is each institution's share of the JRE performance index multiplied by the total number of new JRE cadetships available in the grant year (265). This gives an exact number of new JRE cadetships allocated to each institution.
  • Where the formula results in less than one but more than zero JRE cadetship places for institutions, a default of one cadetship is awarded to those institutions. For other institutions, their allocation of new JRE cadetships is rounded down to the next whole number.
  • For each institution, determine the difference between the exact number of new JRE cadetships to be allocated and the rounded number of new cadetships. The formula then uses a calculation to determine which institutions should be awarded an additional cadetship so that the total number of new JRE cadetships is allocated in full.

b) Calculate JRE cadetship grant amounts

  • Calculate the JRE cadetship grant payable to each institution for Year 1 by using the formula:
    • Number of new cadetships allocated to the HEP for the grant year multiplied by the Cadetship Supplementation amount[2]
  • Calculate the JRE cadetship grant payable to each institution for Year 2 by using the formula:
    • Number of new cadetships allocated to the HEP for the year prior to the grant year multiplied by the (Cadetship Supplementation amount*0.9)
  • Calculate the JRE cadetship grant payable to each institution for Year 3 by using the formula:
    • Number of new cadetships allocated to the HEP for the two years prior to the grant year multiplied by the (Cadetship Supplementation amount*0.75)
  • Calculate the JRE cadetship grant payable to each institution for Year 4 by using the formula:
    • Number of new cadetships allocated to the HEP for the year three years prior to the grant year multiplied by the (Cadetship Supplementation amount*0.75)
  • Each institution's JRE cadetship grant is determined by summing the amounts calculated for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4.

3) Calculate each institution's total JRE funding

  • Each HEP's total JRE funding for the grant year is determined by summing their post-safety net JRE grant and their JRE Grant - Engineering Cadetships funding.

[1] From 2012, legislated funding for the JRE grant excludes funding for the JRE Engineering cadetships component.

[2] The value of the cadetship supplementation amount is defined in section 6 of the JRE Conditions of Grant for the relevant grant year.

Calculation logic for Research Infrastructure Block Grants (RIBG) amounts

  • Calculate each institution's share of the RIBG performance index, which comprises Category 1 Australian competitive grants research income and uses data averaged over two years.
    • For example, for 2016 grant amounts:
      (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian competitive grants research income / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian competitive grants research income).
  • Determine each institution's final grant year RIBG grant amount, which is each institution's share of the RIBG performance index multiplied by the RIBG total funds available for the grant year (i.e. program legislated amount).

Calculation logic for Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA) grant amounts

(1) Calculate number of new APAs

  • Calculate each institution's share of the APA performance index, which comprises 50% HDR completions, 40% research income and 10% publications and uses data averaged over two years.
    • For example, for 2016 commencing APAs:
      0.5* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions) + 0.4* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 research income / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 research income) + 0.1* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 publications / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 publications).
  • Determine each institution's number of new APAs, which is each institution's share of the APA performance index multiplied by the total number of new APAs available (3497 in 2016). This gives an exact number of new APAs allocated to each institution.
  • Where the formula results in less than one but more than zero APA places for institutions, a default of one APA is awarded to those institutions. For other institutions, their allocation of new APAs is rounded down to the next whole number.
  • For each institution, determine the difference between the exact number of new APAs to be allocated and the rounded number of new APAs. The formula then uses a calculation to determine which institutions should be awarded an additional APA so that the total number of new APAs is allocated in full.

(2) Calculate APA grant amounts

  • Calculate the APA grant payable to each institution for Year 1 by using the formula:
    • Number of new APAs allocated to each institution in the grant year multiplied by (Full-time stipend rate + $375 (relocation allowance)).
  • Calculate the APA grant payable to each institution for Year 2 by using the formula:
    • Number of new APAs allocated to each institution prior to the grant year multiplied by (Full-time stipend rate * 0.9).
  • Calculate the APA grant payable to each institution for Year 3 by using the formula:
    • Number of new APAs allocated to each institution two years prior to the grant year multiplied by (Full-time stipend rate * 0.75).
  • Calculate the APA grant payable to each institution for Year 4 by using the formula:
    • Number of new APAs allocated to each institution three years prior to the grant year multiplied by ((Full-time stipend rate * 0.4) + $750 (thesis allowance)).
  • Each institution's APA grant is determined by summing the amounts calculated for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4.

Calculation logic for International Postgraduate Research Scholarships (IPRS) grant amounts

(1) Calculate number of new IPRS

  • Calculate each institution's share of the IPRS performance index, which comprises 50% HDR completions, 40% research income and 10% publications and uses data averaged over two years.
    • For example, for 2016 commencing IPRS:
      0.5* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 weighted HDR completions) + 0.4* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 research income / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 research income) + 0.1* (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 publications / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 publications).
  • Determine each institution's number of new IPRS, which is each institution's share of the IPRS performance index multiplied by the total number of new IPRS available in the grant year (330). This gives an exact number of new IPRS allocated to each institution.
  • Where the formula results in less than one but more than zero IPRS places for institutions, a default of one IPRS is awarded to those institutions.
  • For other institutions, their allocation of new IPRS is rounded down to the next whole number.
  • For each institution, determine the difference between the exact number of new IPRS to be allocated and the rounded number of new IPRS. The formula then uses a calculation to determine which institutions should be awarded an additional IPRS so that the total number of new IPRS is allocated in full.

(2) Calculate IPRS grant amounts

  • Calculate the notional IPRS places to be allocated to each institution for Year 1 by using the formula:
    • Number of new IPRS allocated to each institution in the grant year multiplied by 0.925.
  • Calculate the notional IPRS places to be allocated to each institution for Year 2 by using the formula:
    • Number of new IPRS allocated to each institution prior to the grant year multiplied by 0.925.
  • Calculate the notional IPRS places to be allocated to each institution for Year 3 by using the formula:
    • Number of new IPRS allocated to each institution two years prior to the gran year multiplied by 0.775.
  • Calculate the notional IPRS places to be allocated to each institution for Year 4 by using the formula:
    • Number of new IPRS allocated to each institution three years prior to the grant year multiplied by 0.65.
  • Each institution's IPRS grant is determined by using the formula:
    • (Sum of the institution's notional IPRS places for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4) multiplied by (total IPRS Grant amount / the sum of all institutions' notional IPRS places for Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4).

Calculation logic for Sustainable Research Excellence (SRE) grant amounts

The SRE final grant amount is comprised of three elements, each of which has a funding amount set as a percentage of the SRE total funding for the grant year:

  • Base (20%)
  • Threshold 1 (13%)
  • Threshold 2 (67%)

Only those institutions that agree to participate in Transparent Costing and Excellence in Research for Australia processes are eligible to be included in calculations for Threshold 1 and Threshold 2.

Base element

  • Calculate each institution's share of the Base performance index, which comprises Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income and uses data averaged over two years.
    • For example, for 2016 grant amounts:
      (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income).
  • Determine each institution's SRE Base grant amount, which is each institution's share of the Base performance index multiplied by the Base funds available in the grant year.

Threshold 1 element

  • Calculate each institution's share of the Threshold 1 performance index, which comprises Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income <=$2.5m and uses data averaged over two years.
    • For example, for 2016 allocations:
      (institution's total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income <=$2.5m / ∑ institutions' total average 2013 and 2014 Category 1 Australian Competitive Grants research income <=$2.5m).
  • Determine each institution's SRE Threshold 1 grant amount, which is each institution's share of the Base performance index multiplied by the Threshold 1 funds available in the grant year.

Threshold 2 element

Only HEPs that agree to comply with the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) process and participate in the Transparent Costing (TC) process, including compliance with requirements set out in the Other Grants Guidelines (Research) 2012, are eligible for funding under the Threshold 2 element of SRE.

The Threshold 2 element of SRE has two pools, with funding split between the pools as follows:

  • Transparent Costing (TC) pool, which is equal to 40% of the Threshold 2 funding amount
  • Excellence Index (Ei) pool, which is equal to 60% of the Threshold 2 funding amount.

The department determines each HEP's SRE Threshold 2 grant amount by summing each HEP's final rounded Threshold 2 TC grant amount and final rounded Threshold 2 Ei grant amount.

Threshold 2 Transparent Costing (TC) Pool

There are five key steps to determining each HEP's final Threshold 2 TC grant amount.

1. Initial Threshold 2 TC grant amount

The department determines each HEP's initial Threshold 2 TC grant amount on the basis of the initial Threshold 2 performance index applied against the Threshold 2 TC pool funding amount for the grant year.

The initial Threshold 2 performance index is the relative share of the Category 1 ACG research income data in excess of the threshold of $2,500,000.

Category 1 ACG research income data is the average of the most recent two years for which data is available and is sourced from the HERDC. The income data is unweighted.

For all HEPs, their initial Threshold 2 TC grant amount remains unrounded.

2. TC ratio

Each HEP is assigned a TC ratio.

The TC ratio uses cents expended on indirect costs of ACG research for each ACG dollar of income won. This is calculated by applying the proportion of a HEP's ACG research effort to total academic effort to the total allowable indirect costs claimed, dividing by total Category 1 ACG research income and then multiplying by 100.

Each HEP's proportion of ACG research effort to total academic effort is calculated by multiplying the average ACG FTE spent on ACG research by the total target population, then dividing by the greater of total academic FTE or target population FTE.

Average FTE spent on ACG research is the proportion of time reported as spent on ACG research for each valid respondent converted to FTE totaled for the HEP then divided by the total number of valid survey responses from the HEP.

ACG effort uses information supplied by each HEP from the staff hours survey and is sourced from the Research Hours Data Collection.

The target population and target population FTE is at the time of conducting the staff hours survey and is sourced from the Research Hours Data Collection.

The target population is defined as all employees of a HEP whose continuing or fixed-term employment contract contains a research component. This includes all academic staff with a research only or teaching and research classification and any professional or general staff for whom 'undertaking research' forms a material part of their contract.

Academic FTE is the most recent year for which data is available and is sourced from the Higher Education Staff Collection.

Academic staff is defined as those identified under Element 509 of the Higher Education Staff Collection as having an Academic classification level code (Level A and above, all increments) with respect to their current duties in the Full-Time and Fractional Full-Time Staff input file. The staff data is unweighted.

The total allowable indirect costs claimed is disaggregated from the most recent years audited financial statements and is sourced from the SRE Financial Data Collection.

Category 1 ACG research income is the most recent year for which data is available and is sourced from the HERDC. The income data is unweighted.

3. TC moderator

A TC moderator is calculated for all HEPs eligible for Threshold 2 funding, i.e. those with an initial Threshold 2 performance index greater than zero (0.00%).

Using statistical methods, the TC ratio for Threshold 2 eligible HEPs is divided into quartiles. Assignment to a band is determined by these quartiles. Band A equates to the first quartile, Band B to the second and third quartiles and Band C to the fourth quartile.

For the first quartile, Band A, the TC moderator is set to the lower cap of 1.0. In the fourth quartile, Band C, for those HEPs with markedly higher TC ratios when compared to others (1.5 standard deviations above the mathematical mean of all Threshold 2 eligible TC ratios) the TC moderator is set to the upper cap of 1.2. Individual TC moderator scores are then calculated for all remaining uncapped HEPs in Band B and Band C by adding 1 to the TC multiplier.

The TC multiplier is a scaled individual rate for those uncapped Band B and Band C HEPs. The TC multiplier is calculated based on their proportion of the total of all uncapped Threshold 2 eligible TC ratios applied to 0.2 and rescaled by multiplying by 10.

4. Moderated Threshold 2 TC grant amount

The moderated Threshold 2 TC grant amount is calculated by multiplying the initial Threshold 2 TC grant amount by the TC moderator.

For all HEPs, their moderated Threshold 2 TC grant amount remains unrounded.

5. Final Threshold 2 TC grant amount

The department determines each HEP's final Threshold 2 TC grant amount on the basis of the TC performance index applied against the Threshold 2 TC pool funding amount.

The TC performance index is based on the relative share of moderated Threshold 2 TC grant amounts.

For all HEPs, their unrounded Threshold 2 TC grant amount is rounded down to the next whole dollar. The difference between a HEP’s rounded and unrounded SRE Threshold 2 TC amount is the remainder. The sum of all remainders is the unallocated dollars of the SRE Threshold 2 TC pool.

Each HEP’s remainder is ranked in descending order based on closeness to one. One dollar is assigned to each HEP according to its ranking until all unallocated dollars are exhausted.

Each HEP’s SRE Threshold 2 TC final grant amount is equal to the rounded SRE Threshold 2 TC allocation plus any whole dollars assigned.

Threshold 2 Excellence Index (Ei) Pool

There are four key steps to determining each HEP's final Threshold 2 Ei grant amount.

1. Initial Threshold 2 Ei grant amount

The department determines each HEP's initial Threshold 2 Ei grant amount on the basis of the initial Threshold 2 performance index applied against the Threshold 2 Ei pool funding amount.

The initial Threshold 2 performance index is the relative share of the Category 1 ACG research income data in excess of the Threshold 1 threshold of $2,500,000.

Category 1 ACG research income data is the average of the most recent two years for which data is available and is sourced from the HERDC. The income data is unweighted.

For all HEPs, their initial Threshold 2 Ei grant amount remains unrounded.

2. Ei Score

Each HEP is assigned an Ei score.

The Ei score is calculated for each HEP by creating a composite score of assessed 4-digit Fields of Research (FoR). Each FoR's contribution to the Ei Score is the Weighted Rating applied to the Volume Measure. The HEPs Ei Score is the sum of each FoR's contribution to the Ei Score.

Weighted Ratings are calculated for the HEP by replacing each Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) rating of 3 or above with the relevant weighting. ERA Ratings for each FoR are weighted such that the ratings 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 have a weighting of 7, 3, 1, 0, 0, respectively. A Weighted Rating is not applicable to FoRs that did not meet the output threshold for assessment.

The Volume Measure for each FoR is the relative internal proportion of assessed research outputs as a share of the total outputs assessed for the HEP. FoRs that did not meet the output threshold for assessment have a volume measure of zero (0.00%), and do not form part of the calculation.

The Field of Research (FoR) codes are defined under the Australian Bureau of Statistic's (ABS) Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC).

FoR data is from the 2015 ERA exercise and was provided to the department by the Australian Research Council (ARC).

3. Moderated Threshold 2 Ei grant amount

The moderated Threshold 2 Ei grant amount is calculated by multiplying the initial Threshold 2 Ei grant amount by the Ei score. For all HEPs, their moderated Threshold 2 Ei grant amount remains unrounded.

4. Final Threshold 2 Ei grant amount

The department determines each HEP's final Threshold 2 Ei grant amount on the basis of the Ei performance index applied against the Threshold 2 Ei pool funding amount.

The Ei performance index is based on the relative share of moderated Threshold 2 Ei grant amounts.

For all HEPs, their unrounded Threshold 2 Ei grant amount is rounded down to the next whole dollar. The difference between a HEP’s rounded and unrounded SRE Threshold 2 Ei amount is the remainder. The sum of all remainders is the unallocated dollars of the SRE Threshold 2 Ei pool.

Each HEP’s remainder is ranked in descending order based on closeness to one. One dollar is assigned to each HEP according to its ranking until all unallocated dollars are exhausted.

Each HEP’s SRE Threshold 2 Ei final grant amount is equal to the rounded SRE Threshold 2 Ei allocation plus any whole dollars assigned.

Calculate SRE Final Grant Amount

The SRE grant amount is calculated according to the following formula: SRE grant amount = Base amount + Threshold 1 amount + final Threshold 2 amount (rounded Threshold 2 TC + rounded Threshold 2 Ei amount).