National Youth Affairs Research Scheme publications 2006 - 2012

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2012

Body Image and Disadvantaged / Vulnerable Youth

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2012 by Saul Flaxman, Jen Skattebol, Megan Bedford and kylie valentine (Social Policy Research Centre).The report summarises the similarities and differences between how the target groups of Indigenous young people and young people who are homeless conceptualise and experience body image and makes recommendations for potential future intervention strategies.

Body Image and Disadvantaged / Vulnerable Youth Report

2010

How Young People Participate In Civic Activities Using Internet And Mobile Technologies

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2010 by Jackie Ohlin, Allison Heller, Susan Byrne and Nicky Keevy (URBIS).

This report determines whether young people are engaging in civic and political activities; which types of activities they are engaging in; how online and mobile technologies play a role in this engagement; and what government can do to use these technologies to communicate and interact with young people more effectively.

How Young People Participate In Civic Activities Using Internet And Mobile Technologies Report

2009

Young Carers: Their characteristics and geographical distribution

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2009 by Trish Hill, Ciara Smyth, Cathy Thomson and Bettina Cass (Social Policy Research Centre).

This report provides an insight into the social and demographic characteristics of young carers in Australia, and the ways to identify and support them.

Young Carers: Their characteristics and geographical distribution Report

2008

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Young People and Mentoring: the case of Horn of African young people in Australia

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2008 by Pooja Sawrikar, Megan Griffiths, Kristy Muir (Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales)

The report focuses on how mentoring practices and policies in Australia can best meet the needs of young people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, with a focus on young people from the Horn of Africa. In this study, people from the Horn of Africa originate from Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Sudan and young people refer to those aged between 12 and 25 years.

The broad aim of this study was to understand and compare the needs of Horn of African young people with the needs and resources of mentoring service providers and policy makers.

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Young People and Mentoring: the case of Horn of African young people in Australia Report

Rewriting the Rules for Youth Participation - Inclusion and diversity in government and community decision making

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2008 by Johanna Bell, Ariadne Vromen and Phillippa Collin

This report examined the following:

  • existing opportunities for young people from diverse backgrounds to participate in decision making
  • perceptions and expectations of participation
  • experiences of participation
  • the strengths and limitations of targeted verses universal approaches to involving young people
  • motivations for participation
  • barriers to participation
  • benefits of participation
  • strategies for involving young people from diverse backgrounds.

The research explores the attitudes and experiences of policy makers and service providers, and young people from diverse backgrounds. For the purposes of this project, young people from diverse backgrounds were defined as those aged 12-25 years from one or more of the following backgrounds:

  • Indigenous
  • culturally and linguistically diverse, including refugee and recently arrived communities
  • low socio economic backgrounds
  • young people who have a disability
  • young people who are, or have been, under the guardianship of the Minister (particularly those in foster care)

Rewriting the Rules for Youth Participation - Inclusion and diversity in government and community decision making Report

Young People (12-17 Years) & Financial Debt

A report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme in 2008 by Paul Vittles, Duncan Rintoul, Benita Power & Nichola Keevy (Urbis)

This research report defines and outlines the issue of financial debt for young Australians aged 12 to 17 years and their families. It explores:

  • which young people have financial debt and associated debt management issues
  • the level of debt experienced by young people
  • the means by which young people accrue debt
  • young people’s capability to manage or avoid debt

Young People (12-17 Years) & Financial Debt Report

2007

Barriers to Service Delivery for Young Pregnant Women and Mothers

Prepared for the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme by Deborah Loxton, Jenny Stewart Williams, and Lyn Adamson.

The report shows that the barriers to service delivery for young pregnant women and mothers fall into three main categories:

  • Common barriers;
  • Barriers specific to particular services; and
  • Barriers specific to vulnerable subgroups.

The report also finds that the above barriers occur in complex relationships with each other that can become self-perpetuating. The more barriers a young woman faces, and/or the more vulnerabilities that she experiences, the more difficult it is for her to access services, and the more difficult it will be for service providers to accommodate her needs.

The report concludes that best practice must include the elements that will lead to a strong positive relationship between a young woman and a service provider. A trusting relationship will overcome many of the barriers that may be faced by young pregnant women and mothers. For young women in vulnerable subgroups the most effective services are those that also take account of the complexity of these young women's lives at an individual level.

The report ends with seventeen recommendations for action by governments and service providers.

Barriers to Service Delivery for Young Pregnant Women and Mothers Report

2006

Community Building Through Intergenerational Exchange Programs

Prepared for the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme by Judith MacCallum, David Palmer, Peter Wright, Wendy Cumming-Potvin, Jeremy Northcote, Michelle Brooker, and Cameron Tero.

The report is based on a literature review and the findings of four Australian case studies:

  • The Bankstown Oral History Project in the inner western suburbs of Sydney;
  • The 'Radio Holiday' Project run by Big hART in rural and remote Tasmania;
  • The School Volunteer Program based in Perth; and
  • The Yiriman Project based in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

The report concludes that successful intergenerational exchange programs display four key features:

  • They provide opportunities for the development of relationships between generations;
  • They have access to a range of support mechanisms;
  • They provide opportunities for generations to do a range of things together; and
  • They take account of program-specific issues, such as gender, culture and language.

Community Building Through Intergenerational Exchange Programs Report

* If you are unable to view this report or require alternate formats, please contact library@ssc.gov.au.

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