Glossary

This glossary contains some key terms used on the Quality Schools web pages.

Term Meaning
Approved authority

An approved authority is a legal body the Australian Government Minister for Education and Training has approved to administer funding for a school or schools. The approved authority for a government school is its relevant state or territory government. The approved authority for a non-government school is the legal body approved for that school.

Australian Education Act 2013

The Australian Education Act 2013 is the primary legislation by which the Australian Government provides financial assistance to schools.

Loadings

Commonwealth school funding is based on the Schooling Resource Standard that provides a base amount per student plus loadings to provide extra funding for disadvantaged schools and students. There are six loadings: the student with disability loading, the low English proficiency loading, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) loading, the socio-educational disadvantage loading, the school location loading and the school size loading.

For more information, refer to the factsheet ‘What is the Schooling Resource Standard and how does it work?

Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability (NCCD)

The Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability is an annual collection that counts the number of school students receiving an adjustment due to disability, the category of disability and the level of educational adjustment they are receiving to enable them to participate in education on the same basis as other students.

For more information, refer to the  factsheet ‘What is the Government doing to support students with disability?

Needs-based funding

A model in which funding is based on the needs of individual students and schools.  

Recurrent Funding

Recurrent funding is the annual funding provided to schools to support the day to day operation of the school, including teaching and non-teaching staff salaries, and school operating costs.

Reforms

Reforms refer to the implementation of changes and improvements – for example, new programs or policies for Australia’s schools.

School sectors

The term ‘sector’ is used to differentiate between the two main types of schools in Australia: government and non-government. Non-government includes Catholic and Independent schools.

School system

A school system refers to a group of schools that are affiliated with each other, including for funding purposes. A system has its own needs-based funding model, which it is able to use to redistribute funding between its schools. All government schools are part of their state or territory’s system. Some schools in the non-government sector are also part of a system, e.g. many Catholic schools are part of state Catholic systems.

Schooling Resource Standard (SRS)

The Schooling Resource Standard (SRS) is an estimate of how much funding a school needs to meet the educational needs of its students, as recommended by the 2011 Review of Funding for Schooling.

The SRS is made up of a base amount for every primary and secondary student, along with six loadings to provide extra funding for disadvantaged students and schools.

For more information, refer to factsheet ‘What is the Schooling Resource Standard and how does it work?